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MS Living Well Podcast 2. Remyelination: Repairing Multiple Sclerosis

Sep 3 2019

A single oligodendrocyte “oligo” (colored green) making new myelin on a micropillar (white cone). Cover image by Michael Devereux and Jonah R. Chan. Journal of Neuroscience, Vol. 36, Issue 30, 27 Jul 2016

Remyelination: Repairing Multiple Sclerosis

Myelin is the coating on the nerve cells (neurons) of the nervous system that allows messages to travel rapidly in our body.  Myelin wrapped around the neurons also keeps neurons healthy.  In multiple sclerosis, the immune system attacks myelin disrupting electrical signals and making neurons vulnerable to chronic damage.  Remyelination  is the strategy to recoat the nerves with new myelin.  Myelin-making cells called oligodendrocytes (“oligos”) are described.  The podcast reviews recent laboratory breakthroughs in screening for new treatments to turn on immature oligos to repair myelin.  The exciting initial steps are presented regarding the transition from the laboratory research into clinical trials with multiple sclerosis patients.

Barry Singer, MD, Director of The MS Center for Innovations in Care at Missouri Baptist Medical Center interviews:

Ari Green, MD

Ari J. Green, MD, Chief of Division of Neuroinflammation and Glial Biology, Medical Director of the Multiple Sclerosis and Neuroinflammation Center, Debbie and Andy Rachleff Distinguished Professor of Neurology, Departments of Neurology and Ophthalmology, University of California San Francisco.

Subscribe to this MS Living Well Podcast Series on Spotify or Apple Podcasts

BY: Barry Singer, MD DATE: September 3, 2019 TOPIC: Podcasts